table of contents Table of contents

Testing scripts locally

Having the possibility to run Playwright Test scripts for your browser checks locally will allow you to develop them faster and with more confidence.

Enabling local script execution

You can easily enable local execution by storing your browser check scripts in local folders and passing the path to the right script:

resource "checkly_check" "e2e-checkout" {
  name                      = "Checkout Flow"
  type                      = "BROWSER"
  activated                 = true
  should_fail               = false
  frequency                 = 1
  double_check              = true
  use_global_alert_settings = true
  locations = [
    "us-west-1",
    "eu-central-1"
  ]

  script = file("${path.module}/scripts/checkout.spec.ts") // Or .js - our script is contained in this file
}

Basic checks written with @playwright/test will run locally with npx playwright test and remotely on Checkly without any modifications:

import { test, expect } from '@playwright/test'

test('Should load the web store', async ({ page }) => {
 await page.goto('https://danube-web.shop')

 await expect(page).toHaveTitle('danube-store')
})
const { test, expect } = require('@playwright/test')

test('Should load the web store', async ({ page }) => {
 await page.goto('https://danube-web.shop')

 await expect(page).toHaveTitle('danube-store')
})

If your script is using Page Object Models or imports other files, you can take advantage of Checkly’s code snippets. Consider the following directory structure:

scripts /
|--- snippets /
|     |--- shoppingCart.ts // or .js
|--- checkout.spec.ts // or .js

scripts/snippets/shoppingCart.{js,ts} contains a Page Object Model class encapsulating the logic for the store’s shopping cart page:

import { type Locator, type Page } from '@playwright/test'

export class ShoppingCart {
 shoppingCartButton: Locator
 summary: Locator

 constructor ({ page }: { page: Page }) {
   this.shoppingCartButton = page.locator('#cart')
   this.summary = page.locator('.cart')
 }

 async clickShoppingCartButton () {
   return this.shoppingCartButton.click()
 }
}
export class ShoppingCart {
 constructor ({ page }) {

   this.shoppingCartButton = page.locator('#cart')
   this.summary = page.locator('.cart')
 }

 async clickShoppingCartButton () {
   return this.shoppingCartButton.click()
 }
}

scripts/checkout.spec.{js,ts} file is your Checkly check with the following content:

import { test, expect } from '@playwright/test'
import { ShoppingCart } from './snippets/shoppingCart'

test('Shopping cart should be empty by default', async ({ page }) => {
 await page.goto('https://danube-web.shop')

 const shoppingCart = new ShoppingCart({ page })

 await shoppingCart.clickShoppingCartButton()

 await expect(shoppingCart.summary).toContainText('Your shopping cart is empty')
})
const { test, expect } = require('@playwright/test')
const { ShoppingCart } = require('./snippets/shoppingCart')

test('Shopping cart should be empty by default', async ({ page }) => {
 await page.goto('https://danube-web.shop')

 const shoppingCart = new ShoppingCart({ page })

 await shoppingCart.clickShoppingCartButton()

 await expect(shoppingCart.summary).toContainText('Your shopping cart is empty')
})

As you can see, it imports the ShoppingCart class from the ./snippets/shoppingCart directory and uses its methods and locators within the test. This setup will work out of the box locally with npx playwright test. If you’d like to use the external files in Checkly, you’ll need to declare them as a checkly_snippet resource in your .tf file:

resource "checkly_snippet" "shopping_cart" {
  name   = "shoppingCart" // This will be the name of your file in Checkly!
  script = file("${path.module}/scripts/snippets/shoppingCart.ts") // Or .js - Your script is contained in this file
}

What’s worth noting:

  • Checkly will infer the name for the snippet file based on the name property of the resource schema. Hence, it’s best to name it the same as the local file.
  • The ./snippets/ path is where Checkly will make your snippets available. Use this directory in your Terraform setup to keep things consistent.

If you’d like to store the snippet files in a different directory, using environment variables to define the paths for local and remote execution could be a solution.


Last updated on May 3, 2024. You can contribute to this documentation by editing this page on Github